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Police watchdog begins court docket battle for Winnipeg police cadets’ notes in Taser death


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Police watchdog begins court docket battle for Winnipeg police cadets’ notes in Taser death

Manitoba·NewManitoba’s police watchdog is in court Tuesday to fight the Winnipeg Police Service’s refusal to hand over notes from two cadets who witnessed the 2018 in-custody death of Matthew Fosseneuve, who was shot with a Taser.Winnipeg Police Service refuses to give notes to Independent Investigation Unit of ManitobaAustin Grabish · CBC News · Posted: Feb…

Police watchdog begins court docket battle for Winnipeg police cadets’ notes in Taser death

Manitoba·Recent

Manitoba’s police watchdog is in court docket Tuesday to battle the Winnipeg Police Provider’s refusal at quit notes from two cadets who witnessed the 2018 in-custody death of Matthew Fosseneuve, who used to be shot with a Taser.

Winnipeg Police Provider refuses to present notes to Honest Investigation Unit of Manitoba

Austin Grabish · CBC Recordsdata ·

Matthew Fosseneuve, 34, died in 2018 after he used to be shot with a stun gun. (Submitted)

Manitoba’s police watchdog is in court docket Tuesday to battle the Winnipeg Police Provider’s refusal at quit notes from two cadets who witnessed the 2018 in-custody death of Matthew Fosseneuve, who used to be shot with a Taser.

The Honest Investigation Unit of Manitoba is asking the Court docket of Queen’s Bench to stammer the police carrier to flip over the notes made by the two civilian cadets.

Police verbalize Fosseneuve, 34, used to be performing aggressively and out of control earlier than the stun gun used to be light on him shut to Winnipeg’s Chinatown.

Court docket heard Tuesday the cadets were first at the scene and were threatened along with police officers by Fosseneuve.

Winnipeg police Chief Danny Smyth has refused repeated requests for the notes from the Honest Investigation Unit, which investigates severe behavior engaging police officers.

Police verbalize the IIU doesn’t have the legislative authority to quiz the notes because they’re from civilian staff and no longer police officers.

The case is being heard by Justice Candace Grammond and her decision is anticipated to be precedent-atmosphere.

Winnipeg police counsel Shannon Hanlin wondered in court docket Tuesday why the IIU would want the notes when it be tasked with doing its dangle self reliant probe.

Speaking in overall about cadets, she said their notes taken on the job will seemingly be self-incriminating and may possibly well well trigger them to be capability suspects in legal process.

Cadets preserve the particular to no longer be interviewed by police because they’re deepest citizens, she said.

The cadets who witnessed the 2018 death didn’t seem for interviews requested by the Honest Investigation Unit. 

About the Creator

​Austin Grabish landed his first byline when he used to be moral 18. He joined CBC in 2016 after freelancing for several outlets. ​​In 2018, he used to be half of a crew of CBC journalists who received the Ron Laidlaw Award for the company’s huge digital coverage on asylum seekers crossing into Canada. This past summer season, he used to be on the bottom in northern Manitoba covering the manhunt for B.C. fugitives Bryer Schmegelsky and Kam McLeod, which attracted international consideration. Email: austin.grabish@cbc.ca

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